Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Introduction

The Leica Q (Typ 116) is a 24.2 megapixel compact camera with a 35mm full-frame (24 x 36mm) CMOS sensor with no optical low pass filter, an image-stabilized Leica Summilux 28mm f/1.7 lens with 11 lenses in 9 groups (including 3 aspherical lens elements), FullHD 1920×1080 video at 60/30 fps in the MP4 format, and a touchscreen 3-inch LCD screen with 1,040,000 pixels and 100% field of view. Other key features of the Leica Q (Typ 116) include an auto-focus speed of 0.15 second, sensitivity range of ISO 100-50,000, maximum shutter speed of 1/2000s with the mechanical shutter and 1/6000s with the electronic shutter, Leica Maestro II series image processor, JPEG and DNG RAW file support, a 3.6 megapixel electronic LCOS viewfinder, built-in wi-fi and NFC connectivity, a flash hot shoe, full range of advanced controls from manual exposure to manual focus, and a continuous shooting rate of 10 frames per second. The recommended retail price of the Leica Q (Typ 116) is £2900 / $4250.

Ease of Use

The new Leica Q (Typ 116) sports a stealthy all-black colour-way, with the front half of it featuring a diamond leatherette pattern to aid grip, along with a deep thumb-shaped recess on the rear. The Q has a machined aluminum top plate and a lightweight magnesium alloy body, resulting in a very solid feeling camera that goes some way to justifying the price-tag.

The Leica Q (Typ 116) has a 26.3 megapixel CMOS chip, which pumps out a purported 24.2-megapixel effective resolution. The fixed lens takes 49mm filters and offers a wide 28mm focal length and a fast maximum aperture of f/1.7. This has resulted in a large lens barrel that makes the camera best suited to life in a small camera bag, but the f/1.7 aperture opens up a lot of extra creative possibilities. There is the ability to incrementally alter the aperture from f/1.7 to f/16 via the dedicated aperture dial on the lens barrel. The The Leica Q (Typ 116) also boasts an effective optical stabilization system, which comes in surprisingly handy even though the lens is 28mm.

The Digital Frame Selector setting will crop in either 1.25x to a 35mm equivalent or 1.8x for a 50mm equivalent field of view, which reduces the image size to 15.4 and 7.5 megapixels respectively, with helpful framing lines displayed in the viewfinder/LCD. The selected framing is preserved in the JPEG image files, while the RAW files in DNG format record the entire field captured by the 28mm lens.

The Q (Typ 116)’s looks clearly mirror its maker’s more famous rangefinder cameras, such as the M-series. As well as a top plate dial via which manual adjustments can be made to the shutter speed (from 30 seconds to 1/2000th of a sec), there’s also an electronic shutter that extends the top speed to 16,000th of a sec – simply set the shutter speed dial to the “2000-” setting and use the control dial to choose from 1/2000 to 1/16000. Naturally there is a vacant hotshoe for an accessory flash on top of the camera, but no built-in pop-up flash.

The Leica Q (Typ 116) offers a video mode – Full HD 1920×1080 pixels at 60/30fps in the MP4 format, to be precise, stopped and started by a one-touch movie record button on the top of the camera, with built-in stabilisation and an integrated HDMI-out port for playback on an external device. The size of the back plate LCD is 3-inches and the resolution is a respectable 1,040,000 pixels, bringing the Q (Typ 116) right up to date with comparable cameras.

The Leica Q (Typ 116) comes with a two-year warranty as opposed to the usual one, a year’s accidental damage cover, and a download option for Adobe Lightroom, with the code provided once the product has been registered.

Leica Q (Typ 116)
Front of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

The fact that we don’t have a zoom to play with here prompts a more considered approach to picture taking, in that the photographer has to physically step forward or back to alter what’s included in the frame. You also have to get up close to and interact with your subjects; a camera for surreptitious candids this is not. Leica claims that the 28mm lens was chosen because it’s a classic length for photojournalism, with the minimum focus distance at 30cm or a handy 17cm when set to Macro.

The front of the Leica Q (Typ 116) is adorned with the (in)famous red Leica badge and logo which stands out due its position top right of the lens, with a detachable hard plastic clip-on cap or a more useful lens hood provided as protection for that renowned glass.

Top-left of the lens, if viewing the camera front-on, is a tiny porthole containing the traditional AF assist/self timer lamp. Between the top and bottom of the faceplate there is also a wide band of textured padding that is largely there for show than serving as a practical form of grip. In fact there is nothing resembling a traditional handgrip provided with the camera at all, though there is an optional accessory grip. Having said that, the solidity and weight of the Q (Typ 116)’s build – a much heavier than average for a compact 640g with battery – means that it didn’t feel like the Leica would suddenly slip from our grasp at any point.

There’s a generously sized focusing ring with a ridged edge and clear distance markings from 0.3cms to infinity. Moving the focusing ring on the lens from MF to the AF setting activates the very fast and pleasingly quiet auto-focus system. Though the auto focus occasionally hunts to find a target, overall it’s very quick to lock onto and determine focus and exposure. The front part of the lens can be be unscrewed for the threading on of attachments and the included lens hood.

The Q (Typ 116)’s top plate meanwhile features most of the attributes we’ve already touched on, such as the hotshoe offering full compatibility with the Leica SF 24D and SF 58 system flash units, shutter speed dial, plus the on/off switch that ergonomically encircles the shutter release button. This isn’t just a power switch however as the two ‘on’ settings provided here directly alternate between single shot (‘S’) and continuous shooting (‘C’) options (High (10fps), Medium (5fps) and Low (3fps) settings) – so you’ve always got these drive modes literally at the tip of your forefinger.

Leica Q (Typ 116)
Rear of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

Flick the switch to ‘S’ or ‘C’ setting and the Leica readies itself for action in 1-2 seconds. Squeeze the shutter release button in single shot mode to take a maximum resolution image and the screen instantly displays the resultant image. Take a top quality JPEG and Leica’s ‘DNG’ file version of Raw and the camera isn’t any noticeably slower however, plus the advantage of the DNG format is that it can be opened directly by Photoshop without any specialist conversion software required.

The media of choice is the expected ‘all varieties of SD card’. The back of the Leica Q (Typ 116) features a thumb-operated command dial over at the top right which sets the exposure compensation, with adjustable settings ranging from a standard -3EV to + 3EV.

With the 3-inch LCD screen taking up about two thirds of the back plate, this has left room for a row of five function buttons ranged vertically down the left hand side of the screen, whilst over at the right hand side sits a familiar cross key/command pad style arrangement.

The buttons at the left of the LCD are both clearly marked and instantly comprehended. From the top we have a ‘play’ button for reviewing previously captured images, whilst next up is a delete button.

As this is a Leica camera, obviously manual focus is provided, and very good it is too. Located at about 7 o’clock on the focusing ring is a lever with an inset button – simply press this and rotate the ring to move from auto to manual focusing. As you’d expect, the manual focus ring has a lovely feel, and three different focusing aids are provided – auto magnification (x3 or x6), focus peaking and auto magnification plus focus peaking. With the bigger screen scale and higher resolution we found it easier to accurately determine pin sharpness than on previous Leica compact camera models.

Alternatively if leaving the camera to its Contrast-Detect auto-focus devices, the user has a choice of Multi Point, 1 point, Tracking, Face Detection or two Touch AF settings.

Leica Q (Typ 116)
Top of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

The Leica Q (Typ 116) has a nicely balanced touchscreen interface which works in tandem with the camera’s physical controls. Amongst the 5 different autofocus modes, you can choose Touch AF, which as its name suggests allows you to focus on your subject by simply tapping on the LCD screen, with about 80% of the screen available to use. You can also fire the shutter using the touchscreen via the or Touch AF + Release option, which will really appeal to the mobile generation. In image playback, you can simply drag left and right to go through the sequence of images, and you can configure certain settings like the ISO speed or white balance by tapping the screen, although you can’t use the main menu system via the touchscreen.

The Leica Q (Typ 116) features built-in IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi connectivity for wirelessly connecting to other devices such as a smartphone, tablet or computer. You can easily transfer your images and also control the camera remotely via the free Leica Q app (iOS and Android), which, amongst other functions, allows remote setting of the shutter speed and aperture. The app also allows you to send your images to social networks or email them. The Q (Typ 116) also has built-in NFC which provides tap-to-connect functionality with compatible devices.

The next button down on the backplate strip of five is the configurable Fn button, which by default accesses the white balance settings, and here, in addition to automatic, the usual suspects are provided: tungsten, fluorescent, flash, (daylight) cloudy, (daylight) shady, along with the ability to take your own white balance setting. The button directly beneath governs ISO settings, with here the range going from ISO100 to a top end ISO50000, presented as with the previous setting as a toolbar overlaying the right hand side of the screen.

The bottom button of the row of five on the Q (Typ 116) is the menu button. As we’d expect this is where the nitty gritty of the camera’s operation is decided and acted upon. Naturally enough it’s here that we choose the camera’s resolution, with options ranging from 0.5 megapixels all the way up to 24 megapixels, plus opt for JPG only or DNG + JPG.

Also via the menu screen’s we can select the camera’s metering modes, with multi field metering, centre weighted metering and spot metering all offered up. Further options include the ability to turn image stabilization on or off, individually adjust sharpening, saturation and contrast in camera – with the default setting being ‘standard’ and the other alternatives ranging from ‘low’ to ‘high’.

Leica Q (Typ 116)
The Leica Q (Typ 116) In-hand

Above the LCD screen is the integrated electronic viewfinder. With a massive resolution of 3.68 MP, this is the most detailed electronic viewfinder that we’ve ever had the pleasure of looking through. The same key shooting information that’s shown on the rear LCD is unobtrusively displayed above and below the frame, and there’s dioptre control for glasses-wearers.

Moving to the set of un-marked cross keys on the right of the screen, by default this moves the AF point around the frame when 1 point is selected. We would have liked the option of re-configuring the cross-keys, as they don’t actually do anything if one of the other AF modes is selected.

In the centre of these three buttons we find an un-marked button which acts like a standard ‘display’ button. A press of this in capture mode removes icons for the shooting mode in play, number of shots remaining, battery life, focus and metering mode from the screen to provide a clear view of the subject.

Whilst the left hand flank of the Q (Typ 116) is devoid of features save for a lug for attaching the strap, the right flank features a flip open door protecting two ports: one a five pin mini USB socket and the second for the HDMI output.

The base of the Leica Q (Typ 116) meanwhile features a marginally off-centre screw thread, with a large catch protected compartment housing both the supplied BP-DC12 lithium-ion battery and port for optional removable SD media alongside it.

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 24 megapixel JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 10Mb.

The Leica Q (Typ 116) produced images of excellent quality during the review period. This camera produces noise-free images at ISO 100 up to ISO 1600, with some noise appearing at ISO 3200. The faster settings of ISO 6400 and 12,800 are still usable, although we’d suggest avoiding ISO 25,600 and especially 50,000 if possible. The 24 megapixel images were a little soft straight out of the camera at the default sharpening setting and ideally require some further sharpening in an application like Adobe Photoshop, or you can change the in-camera setting. The night photograph was very good, with the maximum shutter speed of 30 seconds allowing you to capture enough light in most situations, while the built-in image stabilisation allows you to take sharp photos at slower shutter speeds. The useful Macro setting is easily activated via a ring on the lens barrel and allows you to focus on a subject that is 17cms away from the camera.

Noise

There are 10 ISO settings available on the Leica Q (Typ 116). Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting:

JPEG RAW

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 50000 (100% Crop)

ISO 50000 (100% Crop)

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web – Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images are a little soft at the default sharpening setting. You can change the in-camera sharpening level if you don’t like the default look.

Original (100% Crop)

Sharpened (100% Crop)

   

Focal Range

The Leica Q (Typ 116)’s lens provides a focal length of 28mm in 35mm terms, as demonstrated below.

28mm

Macro

The Leica Q (Typ 116) offers a Macro setting that allows you to focus on a subject that is 17cms away from the camera. The first image shows how close you can get to the subject (in this case a compact flash card). The second image is a 100% crop.

Macro

Macro (100% Crop)

Night

The Leica Q (Typ 116)’s maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds in the Manual mode, which is great news if you’re seriously interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 30 seconds at ISO 100.

Night

Night (100% Crop)

Anti Shake

The Leica Q (Typ 116) has an anti-shake mechanism, which allows you to take sharp photos at slower shutter speeds than wthout it turned on. To test this, we took 2 handheld shots of the same subject with the same settings. The first shot was taken with anti shake turned off, the second with it turned on.

Shutter Speed / Focal Length

Anti Shake Off (100% Crop)

Anti Shake On (100% Crop)

1/3sec / 28mm

Digital Zoom

The Leica Q (Typ 116) has a digital zoom option that crops the sensor to provide additional 35mm and 50mm viewpoints, with framing lines displayed in the viewfinder/LCD screen.

28mm

35mm

   

50mm

 
 

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Sample Images

This is a selection of sample images from the Leica Q (Typ 116) camera, which were all taken using the 24 megapixel JPEG setting. The thumbnails below link to the full-sized versions, which have not been altered in any way.

Sample RAW Images

The Leica Q (Typ 116) enables users to capture RAW and JPEG format files. We’ve provided some Leica RAW (DNG) samples for you to download (thumbnail images shown below are not 100% representative).

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/10s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/20s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 200
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/40s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/60s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 800
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/125s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 1600
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/250s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 3200
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/500s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 6400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/1000s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 12500
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/2000s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 25000
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/4000s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 50000
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/60s · f/4 · 28mm · ISO 3200
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/60s · f/5 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/800s · f/1.7 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/60s · f/2 · 28mm · ISO 400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/200s · f/1.7 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/400s · f/1.7 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/320s · f/1.7 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/125s · f/8 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/60s · f/4 · 28mm · ISO 1600
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/80s · f/16 · 28mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample Movie

This is a sample movie at the highest quality setting of 1920×1080 pixels at 60 frames per second. Please note that this 20 second movie is 67.3Mb in size.

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Product Images

Leica Q (Typ 116)

Front of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Side of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Side of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Rear of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Rear of the Leica Q (Typ 116) / Image Displayed

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Rear of the Leica Q (Typ 116) / Turned On

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Rear of the Leica Q (Typ 116) / Main Menu

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Top of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)

Bottom of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 

Leica Q (Typ 116)

Side of the Leica Q (Typ 116)

 
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Side of the Leica Q (Typ 116)
 
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Front of the Leica Q (Typ 116)
 
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Front of the Leica Q (Typ 116)
 
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Memory Card Slot
 
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Battery Compartment

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Specifications

Picture format/
aspect ratio
24 x 36 mm.
2:3.
Lens Leica Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH., 11 elements in 9 groups, 3 aspherical elements.
Digital frame selector
(digital zoom)
Selectable: approx. 1.25 x (corresponds to focal length of 35 mm) or
approx. 1.8 x (corresponds to focal length of 50 mm).
Image stabilization Optical compensation system for photo and video recordings.
Aperture range 1.7 to 16 in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Picture sensor/
resolution
CMOS sensor, 26.3/24.2 million pixels (total/effective).
Dynamic range 13 aperture stops.
Color depth 14 bit.
Photo capture format Selectable: DNG + JPEG, JPEG.
DNG/JPEG resolution Focal length 28 mm: megapixels (6000 × 4000 pixels), megapixels (4272 × 2848 pixels),
megapixels (2976 × 1984 pixels), megapixels (1600 × 1080 pixels).
Focal length 35 mm: megapixels (4800 × 3200 pixels), megapixels (3424 × 2288 pixels),
megapixels (2384 × 1592 pixels), megapixels (1280 × 856 pixels).
Focal length 50 mm: megapixels (3360 × 2240 pixels), megapixels (2400 × 1600 pixels),
megapixels (1680 × 1120 pixels), megapixels (896 × 600 pixels).
Video recording format MP4.
Video resolution/
frame rate
Selectable:
FHD: 1920 x 1080 p with 60 or 30 fps. HD: 1280 x 720 p with 30 fps.
Sound recording format AAC.
Microphone Stereo.
Lautsprecher Mono.
Storage media SD/SDHC/SDXC, multimedia cards, speed class: UHS-1.
ISO range Automatic, ISO 100 to ISO 50000.
White balance Automatic, default settings for: daylight, cloudy, halogen lighting, shadow, electronic flash, two manual settings with
measuring, manual color temperature setting.
Color space Selectable for photos: sRGB, Adobe® RGB, ECI RGB, for videos: sRGB.
Sharpness/saturation/
contrast
Each selectable in 5 steps, also available as option in saturation .
Focusing range 30 cm to ∞, with macro setting from 17 cm.
Focus setting Automatic (autofocus) or manual focusing, option of magnifying function and edge marking (focus peaking)
available for manual setting.
Autofocus system Contrast-based autofocus system.
Autofocus modes AFS (shutter release only after successful focusing), AFC (shutter release possible at any time), AF setting can be
saved.
Autofocus metering
methods
Single zone (adjustable), multi-field (49 zones), face recognition, subject tracking, optional setting/shutter release
by touching the monitor.
Exposure modes Automatic program, aperture priority, shutter speed priority and manual setting.
Scene modes Fully automatic, sport, portrait, landscape, night portrait, snow/beach, candlelight, sunset, digiscoping,
miniature effect, panorama, time lapse.
Exposure metering
methods
Multi-field, center-weighted, spot.
Exposure compensation ±3 EV in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Automatic bracketing Three exposures in graduations of up to 3 EV, can be set in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Shutter type Mechanical and electronical.
Shutter speeds 30 s to 1⁄2000 s with mech. Shutter 1⁄2500 s to 1⁄16000 s with electr. shutter, in 1⁄3 increments,
flash synchronization up to 1⁄500 s.
Picture series Selectable: 10/5/3 fps (H/M/L).
Self-timer Delay time either 2 s or 12 s.
Viewfinder Electronic LCOS display, resolution: 1280 × 960 pixels x 3 colors (=3,68 MP), aspect ratio: 4:3,
eyepiece: ±3 diopters, with eye sensor for automatic switching between viewfinder and monitor.
Monitor 3″ TFT LCD monitor with approx. 1,040,000 pixels, touch control possible.
WLAN Satisfies IEEE 802.11b/g/n standard (standard WLAN protocol), channel 1-11,
encryption method: WLAN-compatible WPA™/ WPA2™, access method: infrastructure mode.
NFC According to JIS X 6319-4 standard/13.56 MHz.
Connections Micro USB socket (2.0), HDMI socket.
Power supply Leica BP-DC12 lithium ion battery, rated voltage 7.2 V DC, capacity: 1200 mAh.
Charger Leica BC-DC12, input: 100–240 V AC, 50/60 Hz, automatic switching, output: 8.4 V DC; 0.65 A.
Body Leica design made completely of extremely light magnesium and aluminum, two eyelets for the carrying strap,
ISO accessory shoe with center and control contacts to connect flash units, such as the Leica SF26.
Lens filter thread E49.
Tripod thread A 1/4 DIN 4503 (1/4″).
Dimensions (W x H x D) Approx. 130 × 80 × 93 mm (5.12 × 3.15 × 3.66 in)
Weight Approx. 590/640 g / 20.8/22.6 oz. (without/with battery).
Scope of delivery Camera, carrying strap, lens hood, lens cap, accessory shoe cover, battery, charger,
power cable (EU, US, local power cable), USB cable.
Software Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom® (free download after registration of the camera), Leica App for iOS®
(free download remote control and picture transfer in Apple® App-Store®/Google® Play Store®).
Selectable: approx. 1.25 x (corresponds to focal length of 35 mm) or
approx. 1.8 x (corresponds to focal length of 50 mm).
Image stabilization Optical compensation system for photo and video recordings.
Aperture range 1.7 to 16 in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Picture sensor/
resolution
CMOS sensor, 26.3/24.2 million pixels (total/effective).
Dynamic range 13 aperture stops.
Color depth 14 bit.
Photo capture format Selectable: DNG + JPEG, JPEG.
DNG/JPEG resolution Focal length 28 mm: megapixels (6000 × 4000 pixels), megapixels (4272 × 2848 pixels),
megapixels (2976 × 1984 pixels), megapixels (1600 × 1080 pixels).
Focal length 35 mm: megapixels (4800 × 3200 pixels), megapixels (3424 × 2288 pixels),
megapixels (2384 × 1592 pixels), megapixels (1280 × 856 pixels).
Focal length 50 mm: megapixels (3360 × 2240 pixels), megapixels (2400 × 1600 pixels),
megapixels (1680 × 1120 pixels), megapixels (896 × 600 pixels).
Video recording format MP4.
Video resolution/
frame rate
Selectable:
FHD: 1920 x 1080 p with 60 or 30 fps. HD: 1280 x 720 p with 30 fps.
Sound recording format AAC.
Microphone Stereo.
Lautsprecher Mono.
Storage media SD/SDHC/SDXC, multimedia cards, speed class: UHS-1.
ISO range Automatic, ISO 100 to ISO 50000.
White balance Automatic, default settings for: daylight, cloudy, halogen lighting, shadow, electronic flash, two manual settings with
measuring, manual color temperature setting.
Color space Selectable for photos: sRGB, Adobe® RGB, ECI RGB, for videos: sRGB.
Sharpness/saturation/
contrast
Each selectable in 5 steps, also available as option in saturation .
Focusing range 30 cm to ∞, with macro setting from 17 cm.
Focus setting Automatic (autofocus) or manual focusing, option of magnifying function and edge marking (focus peaking)
available for manual setting.
Autofocus system Contrast-based autofocus system.
Autofocus modes AFS (shutter release only after successful focusing), AFC (shutter release possible at any time), AF setting can be
saved.
Autofocus metering
methods
Single zone (adjustable), multi-field (49 zones), face recognition, subject tracking, optional setting/shutter release
by touching the monitor.
Exposure modes Automatic program, aperture priority, shutter speed priority and manual setting.
Scene modes Fully automatic, sport, portrait, landscape, night portrait, snow/beach, candlelight, sunset, digiscoping,
miniature effect, panorama, time lapse.
Exposure metering
methods
Multi-field, center-weighted, spot.
Exposure compensation ±3 EV in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Automatic bracketing Three exposures in graduations of up to 3 EV, can be set in 1⁄3 EV increments.
Shutter type Mechanical and electronical.
Shutter speeds 30 s to 1⁄2000 s with mech. Shutter 1⁄2500 s to 1⁄16000 s with electr. shutter, in 1⁄3 increments,
flash synchronization up to 1⁄500 s.
Picture series Selectable: 10/5/3 fps (H/M/L).
Self-timer Delay time either 2 s or 12 s.
Viewfinder Electronic LCOS display, resolution: 1280 × 960 pixels x 3 colors (=3,68 MP), aspect ratio: 4:3,
eyepiece: ±3 diopters, with eye sensor for automatic switching between viewfinder and monitor.
Monitor 3″ TFT LCD monitor with approx. 1,040,000 pixels, touch control possible.
WLAN Satisfies IEEE 802.11b/g/n standard (standard WLAN protocol), channel 1-11,
encryption method: WLAN-compatible WPA™/ WPA2™, access method: infrastructure mode.
NFC According to JIS X 6319-4 standard/13.56 MHz.
Connections Micro USB socket (2.0), HDMI socket.
Power supply Leica BP-DC12 lithium ion battery, rated voltage 7.2 V DC, capacity: 1200 mAh.
Charger Leica BC-DC12, input: 100–240 V AC, 50/60 Hz, automatic switching, output: 8.4 V DC; 0.65 A.
Body Leica design made completely of extremely light magnesium and aluminum, two eyelets for the carrying strap,
ISO accessory shoe with center and control contacts to connect flash units, such as the Leica SF26.
Lens filter thread E49.
Tripod thread A 1/4 DIN 4503 (1/4″).
Dimensions (W x H x D) Approx. 130 × 80 × 93 mm (5.12 × 3.15 × 3.66 in)
Weight Approx. 590/640 g / 20.8/22.6 oz. (without/with battery).
Scope of delivery Camera, carrying strap, lens hood, lens cap, accessory shoe cover, battery, charger,
power cable (EU, US, local power cable), USB cable.
Software Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom® (free download after registration of the camera), Leica App for iOS®
(free download remote control and picture transfer in Apple® App-Store®/Google® Play Store®).

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Conclusion

The Leica Q (Typ 116) is the best serious compact camera that Leica have ever released, offering fantastic image quality, great handling and build-quality, and a number of surprisingly innovative features which include very fast auto-focusing, although it’s also the most expensive too.

Offering a unique combination of a 35mm full-frame sensor and fixed 28mm lens, the Leica Q’s natural rivals are the now ageing Sony RX1 and RX1R, but they don’t offer such a wide or fast lens, a built-in viewfinder, or a touchscreen interface. The Fujifilm X100T is a much cheaper rival, but that uses a smaller APS-C sensor and again a slower 35mm lens.

The Leica Q (Typ 116)’s fast f/1.7 lens, complete with built-in OIS, is very welcome, making it easy to capture sharp images in low-light, capturing better bokeh effects, and offering a useful close focusing distance of 17cms in the Macro mode. The ability to quickly switch from manual to auto focus simply by turning the focusing ring is also a great addition, as is the ability to set the aperture by the dedicated lens ring. The surprising icing on the cake is the Q’s excellent auto-focusing system, which despite being contrast-based is easily the fastest of any Leica camera that we’ve tested and up there with the best mirrorless cameras currently on the market, only faltering slightly in very low light.

Image quality is excellent, with lovely colour rendition, bags of detail thanks to the full-frame sensor and no optical low-pass filter, and good noise performance from ISO100-3200, with the faster ISO settings proving usable too.

The new Leica Q (Typ 116) is the most accomplished Leica compact camera yet, although with a price-tag of £2900 / $4295, it’s certainly a serious investment. Still, if you highly value the combination of a superlative 28mm fixed lens and fantastic full-frame image quality, we can certainly recommend the new Leica Q (Typ 116), especially as it’s actually pretty cheap when compared to Leica’s rangefinders and an equivalent lens…

4.5 stars

Ratings (out of 5)
Design 4
Features 4.5
Ease-of-use 4.5
Image quality 4.5
Value for money 4

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Main Rivals

Listed below are some of the rivals of the Leica Q (Typ 116).

Fujifilm X100T

Fujifilm X100T Review thumbnail

The new Fujifilm X100T is the third generation of Fujfilm’s wildly popular 35mm f/2 fixed lens compact camera. Building on the success of last year’s X100S, the new X100T focuses on making the handling and operation even better than before. Have Fujifilm succeeded in the tricky task of making an already brilliant camera even better? Read our in-depth Fujifilm X100T review to find out…

Ricoh GR

Ricoh GR Review thumbnail

At first glance the Ricoh GR looks like a street photographer’s dream camera. With a fixed focal length 28mm wide-angle lens, 16 megapixel APS-C sensor, high-res 3 inch LCD screen, flash hotshoe, wealth of customisable controls and a fast auto-focus system, does the pocketable Ricoh GR live up to its promise? Read our in-depth Ricoh GR review complete with full-size image samples to find out…

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 Review thumbnail

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 is the first ever compact camera with a 35mm full-frame sensor. Promising to combine high-end DSLR image quality with compact portability, the Sony RX1 also features a 35mm Carl Zeiss prime lens with a fast maximum aperture of f/2, full 1080p high-definition video, high-resolution 3-inch screen, manual shooting modes, 5fps continuous shooting, ISO range of 50-25,600, and 14-bit raw support. Read our expert Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 review to find out if it’s the best compact camera ever made…

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R Review thumbnail

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R is a new version of last year’s RX1 with the optical low-pass filter removed, promising increased resolution but at the risk of increased moire effects. The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R is otherwise identical to the RX1, featuring a 35mm Carl Zeiss prime lens with a fast maximum aperture of f/2, full 1080p high-definition video, high-resolution 3-inch screen, manual shooting modes, 5fps continuous shooting, ISO range of 50-25,600, and 14-bit raw support. Read our expert Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R review to find out if it can improve on the original RX1…

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Review Roundup

Reviews of the Leica Q (Typ 116) from around the web.

techradar.com »

It’s not too long ago that the vast majority of photographs were taken using 35mm film. Since the advent of digital photography, technical and cost limitations have meant that full-frame sensors, those that are the same size as a 35mm film frame, have been restricted to a few high-end SLRs, rangefinders and compact system cameras, and until now just two compact cameras – the Sony RX1 and Sony RX1R. Now these rare beasts are joined by the Leica Q.
Read the full review »

blog.mingthein.com »

It is refreshing to be surprised, for a change – and refreshing to have something that comes somewhat unexpectedly but scratches an itch that you didn’t really know existed. I have owned and reviewed many Leicas in the past, from Ms, to the S system, to the T, X/1/2/113/Vario, to various ahem…rebodies. All have excited me in some way or other, but also left me with the feeling ‘if only’. If only the M had a built in EVF…if only the S had more pixels…if only the T was a bit smoother operationally…if only the Xs had viewfinders (and were 28mm). I was disappointed I couldn’t get a M246 Monochrom to test, especially against the D810. Instead, I was offered the Q.
Read the full review »

thephoblographer.com »

Every time I enter a Leica meeting, I always hope and pray for the same thing: a digital Leica CL. After reading none of the rumors around the web, I wondered if Leica had finally done it. “What? Is this a digital CL? I’ve been asking for this for years.”
Read more at http://www.thephoblographer.com/2015/06/10/review-leica-q/#pW4K5kubp4Vuq2Ss.99
Read the full review »

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Leica Q (Typ 116) Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

SOURCE:http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/leica_q_typ_116_review