Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Introduction

The Samsung NX10 is a new mirror-less compact digital camera with a large image sensor, electronic viewfinder and interchangeable lenses which is intended to bridge the gap between a small compact and large DSLR. A clear rival to the Micro Four Thirds cameras from Olympus and Panasonic, the NX-series is a proprietary rather than open standard, using the brand new NX-mount lens system. The first Samsung NX model has a 14.6 megapixel APS-C sized CMOS sensor, which is physically the same size as those used in entry-level DSLRs and notably larger than the MFT sensor, promising better image quality especially at higher ISO values. Styled like a mini-DSLR, the NX10 incorporates a high-resolution electronic viewfinder with eye-sensor, large 3 inch AMOLED LCD screen, built-in pop-up flash, fast contrast auto-focus system, 720p HD movies and Supersonic Dust Reduction system. The NX10 has a wide range of manual controls plus a Smart Auto function which automatically selects the best shooting mode, while the Smart Range feature captures detail in both the bright and dark areas of the picture. Available in black or silver, the Samsung NX10 retails for £599.99 / $699.99 with the 18-55mm OIS lens, £649.99 with the 30mm pancake lens, £699.99 with the 18-55mm OIS and 50-200mm OIS lenses, and £749.99 with the 18-55mm OIS and 30mm pancake lenses.

Ease of Use

The recent launch of mirror-less compact cameras with large sensors have certainly captured the imagination of many photographers recently. Featuring compact-like handling combined with DSLR image quality, the first wave of models from Olympus and Panasonic have all been part of the open Micro Four Thirds standard, targeting those users who want to trade up from a compact but who are scared away by the size and complexity of a DSLR, and also DSLR owners looking for a moore portable second camera. Now the electronics behemoth Samsung have entered the fray with their own proprietary system, dubbed “NX”, the smaller alternative to their GX DSLR series. Samsung have decided to use an APS-C sensor in the NX10, which is around 1.5x physically larger than the Four Thirds one and which should give it in the edge in terms of all-round image quality, whilst still maintaining a small camera body that is only slightly deeper than the likes of the Olympus E-PL1. With 3 lenses, flashguns and accessories available on launch, with 5 more lenses planned for release in 2010, Samsung have clearly made a big commitment to the NX concept.

First impressions of the NX10 are very positive, especially considering the aggressive pricing that undercuts all its main rivals by some considerable margin. Samsung have opted to make the NX10 a mass-market device with an all-plastic body and 18-55mm kit lens with a plastic mount, rather than taking on the more premium offerings from Olympus and Panasonic (the plastic E-PL1 aside). This is not to say that the NX10 isn’t well-built though, and it’s certainly a light camera at just over 350g, which you’ll appreciate during a long day’s shooting. At 123×87×39.8mm, the NX10 isn’t much bigger than the slimline PEN cameras and the Panasonic GF1, and is actually a little slimmer and lighter than the comparable G1 / GH1 models – impressive given the larger sensor inside. The depth and weight increase when the supplied poly-carbonate mounted 18-55mm kit lens is fitted, making the NX10 instantly more DSLR-like, but fitting the 30mm pancake lens creates a compact overall package that will particularly suit street photographers looking for an indiscrete camera.

The lenses are where the main area where the NX10 suffers in comparison to the Micro Four Thirds cameras, especially if you’re looking for the smallest overall package. The NX10 is relatively tiny when twinned with the 30mm pancake lens, but the 18-55mm and especially the 50-200mm lens are quite a lot bigger and heavier than their MFT’s equivalents – take a look at the Product Images page to get an idea of just how large they make the NX10 as a whole. This is completely understandable given the larger sensor that lies at the heart of the NX10, and is the trade-off for the image quality advantages that an APS-C sensor offers. Only you can decide if size and portability or image quality is more important to you. The other downside from a specification point of view are the relatively slow maximum apertures – f/3.5-5.6 for the 18-55mm lens, and f4-5.6 for the 50-200mm aren’t going to set anyone’s pulse racing, but it’s still very early days for the NX system.

Optical image stabilisation is supplied via the lenses, rather than being built-in to the camera body as with the Olympus cameras. Initially available on the 18-55mm and 50-200mm lenses (but not the 30mm pancake) it can be turned on and off via the OIS switch on the lens barrel, with two different modes accessible through the main menu system. When enabled, the NX10 automatically compensates for camera shake, which is a slight blurring of the image that typically occurs at slow shutter speeds when the camera is hand held. In practice I found that it does make a noticeable difference. You don’t notice that the camera is actually doing anything different when anti-shake is turned on, just that you can use slower shutter speeds than normal and still take sharp photos. Thankfully leaving the anti-shake system on all the time didn’t affect the battery-life too badly. One slight annoyance is the loose action of both the OIS and AF/MF switches on the lenses – on more than one occasion they had been inadvertently moved to a different setting when stored in a shoulder bag.

One area where the NX10 really shines is styling and layout. In my opinion this is the best-looking of all the mirror-less cameras, opting for a clean and modern DSLR-like design rather than the retro look of Olympus’ PEN series, and which is more curved and “organic” than the Panasonic G-series models. More importantly it also offer a logical and intuitive interface that belies the fact that this is a first generation product. Samsung’s engineering team have firmly hit the nail on the head here, striking a great balance between providing easy access to the main features and achieving an uncluttered control system whilst still managing to cater for both beginner and prosumer alike. The NX10 is also better constructed than you’d expect given its relatively small size, light weight and budget price-tag, and is on a par with a lot of entry-level DSLRs.

Samsung NX10 Samsung NX10
Front Rear

Large metal neck strap eyelets are located on top of the NX10 at the sides, with the rear dominated by the fixed 3 inch LCD screen. There’s a generous, textured black plastic hand-grip on the left-front of the camera and a thumb-grip on the rear finished in the same rubberised material. When it comes to storing your photographs the GX10 uses SD / SDHC cards, with the memory card slot positioned in the right-hand side of the camera body and protected by a plastic cover, a much better solution than sharing the battery compartment like most cameras do. On the left side of the body is a larger cover that houses four different ports – DC In, HDMI for connecting the G1 to a HD television or monitor, Remote socket for use with the optional remote shutter release, and AV Out. Having all of these connections in one location makes perfect sense.

On the front of the Samsung NX10 is a small focus-assist and self-timer indicator lamp, lens release button, the NX lens mount, rubberised hand-grip, and a handy and un-expected Depth of Field Preview button. Located on the bottom of the camera is the battery compartment protected by a plastic lockable cover. The BP1310 battery provides up to 400 shots under the CIPA testing standard, on a par with the NX10’s main rivals. Also found on the bottom of the camera is a metal tripod mount which is commendably located in-line with the centre of the lens mount.

Like the Panasonic G1 and GH1, the NX10 features a built-in electronic viewfinder. The mere mention of an EVF is usually enough to elicit loud groans from any serious photographer, as they have traditionally been poorly implemented in the past, with low-res, grainy displays that were only really suitable for still subjects. Thankfully the electronic viewfinder on the NX10 is much better than most other systems, although not quite as good as the Panasonic cameras. It has a 0.86x magnification and offers 100% field of view, but the resolution is an impressive but lower 921,000 dots and it only operates at 30fps rather than 60fps as on the Panasonic G1 and GH1.

The NX10 does have a handy eye sensor underneath the EVF, which switches seamlessly between the LCD screen and the EVF when you hold it up to your eye, saving battery power and removing the unwanted distraction of the LCD display. As the EVF is reading the same signal from the image sensor as the rear LCD screen, it can also display similar information – for example, you can view and operate the Function Menu and see all the current settings, giving quick access to all the key camera settings while it’s held up to your eye.

The NX10’s 3-inch, 614,000-dot rear LCD screen is very impressive, incorporating AMOLED (Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology that provides a number of key advantages over traditional LCD screens. These include easier viewing in bright sunshine and a very wide viewing angle, 10,000 times faster refresh rate than conventional LCDs, less power consumption and a high contrast ratio of 10,000:1. On a less positive note our review sample picked up a few scratches and marks just a few days after arriving in the office, so make sure that you store the NX10 carefully at all times, and it also doesn’t offer the flexibility of the G1 / GH1’s swiveling LCD screen.

Samsung NX10 Samsung NX10
Front Top

The NX10 has a built-in dust-removal system that vibrates the sensor 60,000 times per second to remove any unwanted specks from appearing in your images. By default this feature is turned off, something of an oversight by Samsung, so make sure to enable it so that it works every time you start-up the camera (it only takes about one second). You can also perform a manual sensor clean at any point. The NX10 has a built-in pop-up flash which is activated by a switch on the top of the camera. This useful pop-up unit offers a range of flash synchronisation modes, guide number of 11 at ISO 100, an X-sync speed of 1/180 s / 1/4000 second, and coverage for a 28mm wide lens. The NX10 also offers a flash hotshoe that will accept compatible Samsung flashguns (currently just the SEF-42A and SEF-20A models).

Also found on top of the NX10 are the mono mic, burst mode/bracketing/self-timer switch, on/off switch, and tactile shutter button. The small Green button is used in conjunction with other controls to reset them to default values, for example the exposure compensation. There’s a traditional round dial with a positive click for the different exposure modes, which is a typical feature of DSLR cameras and enables you to quickly change between the various options. The usual selection of Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, and Manual are available for the more experienced photographers, and the more beginner-friendly Scene modes and Smart Auto mode are also accessed via this dial.

Smart Auto is Samsung’s equivalent of the intelligent auto modes on competitors from Panasonic (its Lumix range), Sony (the latest T-series Cyber-shots) and Canon (Digital IXUS family). You simply point the GX10 at a scene or subject and the camera hopefully recognizes it from 16 commonly used presets and automatically adjusts its settings to deliver optimum results. This means that it’s not necessary for the user to manually delve into scene modes to call up the likes of ‘landscape’ or ‘flower’, making the NX10’s operation merely a case of point and shoot. In practice the Smart Auto system works very well, with the NX10 usually picking the most appropriate combination of settings for the current situation. Obviously not all situations are covered by the 16 scene modes that the system uses, but it does work for the majority of the time. It makes it possible for the less experienced photographer to easily take well-exposed, sharp pictures of people, scenery and close-ups by simply pointing and shooting the camera and is more intuitive than the traditional scene modes (which are still available).

Completing the camera’s top-plate is a control dial which is used for, amongst other things, changing the aperture and shutter speed by turning from left to right and back again. As with the shooting mode dial, this is a common feature found on DSLR cameras, so you’ll be right at home if you’ve used a DSLR before – compact camera users will need to become accustomed to using this dial. In Manual mode things are a little trickier. You have to hold down the Exposure Compensation button whilst turning the control dial to be able to change the aperture, which obviously isn’t as convenient as having a second control dial as on some DSLRs, but is perhaps understandable given the NX10’s target audience.

Samsung NX10 Samsung NX10
Front Lenses

The NX10 can record high-resolution HD 720p 1280×720 movies in the 16:9 aspect ratio and standard VGA 640×480 or 320×260 movies in the 4:3 aspect ratio, all using the H.264 format at 30 frames per second. The Movie mode is accessed by selecting the Movie option on the shooting mode dial and then pressing the shutter button to begin recording. Only Mono sound is recorded during video capture via the small internal mic on the top of of the camera. The HDMI port allows you to connect the NX10 to a high-def TV set, but unfortunately Samsung have decided to cut costs and not include a HDMI cable as standard in the box, which means that you’ll have to purchase one separately to take advantage of this camera’s HD connectivity.

Turning to the rear of the NX10, to the right of the large LCD screen that I’ve already mentioned is a familiar round navigation pad with four buttons above and two below. Starting at the top are very handily placed buttons fort setting exposure compensation and locking the exposure, then the DISP button which cycles through the various display modes on the LCD screen. The fourth button is the useful Fn, which provides quick and easy access to 7 of the most important camera settings, which are presented as a horizontal row of icons in the EVF or LCD screen. Used in combination with the four directions on the navigation pad that set the Focus type, White Balance, ISO and Metering, you really can access most of the NX10’s key options with one press of a button, although changing them takes a couple more presses. Completing the rear controls are buttons for playing back and deleting your images, with the latter accessing the Picture Wizard options during shooting.

Unlike a conventional DSLR camera which uses a phase detection auto-focus system, the NX10 employs the same Contrast AF system that is commonly used by compact cameras. As with the EVF, experienced photographers will now be tutting loudly at the thought of having to use a traditionally slower system, but thankfully this decision hasn’t resulted in a slow and unpredictable AF – quite the contrary in fact. The Samsung NX10’s focusing speed is on a par with the speedy Panasonic G1 / GH1 cameras and most DSLRs. This means that it is noticeably quicker to lock onto the subject than the Olympus PEN series which crucially suffer from a 1/2 second lag. There were also very few occasions when the NX10 failed to lock onto the subject, especially when using the centre AF point, which can be usefully set to one of four different sizes.

There are four AF Area modes on offer, including Selection AF with a selectable focus area, Multi AF, Face Detection, and Self-Portrait Tracking, with Single, Continuous and Manual AF Modes available. The NX10 also has a useful AF Priority function that begins focusing as soon as you point the camera. Manual focusing is assisted by the ‘enlarged display’ function. Once you have selected manual focus mode on the lens barrel, turning the manual focus ring automatically increases the magnification on the LCD display, which is a big help in getting the focus spot on. This is real, non-interpolated magnification, very useful for accurate manual focusing – provided you find a way to steady the camera. The screen cleverly returns to normal magnification when you stop using the manual focus ring for a few seconds. Metering options include Multi, Center-weighted and Spot, while the ISO range runs from 100-3200. There are 6 white balance presets plus Auto and Custom settings and the ability to set a precise Kelvin value, and if you can’t make up your mind the white balance, exposure and even the Picture Wizard settings can all be bracketed.

Samsung NX10 Samsung NX10
Memory Card Slot Battery Compartment

You can shoot movies using the Program or Aperture-priority modes, giving you some control over exposure, and you can also change the aperture during recording, albeit at the expense of recording the mechanism on the soundtrack. The NX10 offers the ability to use any of the 9 Picture Wizard settings during video recording as well as still images, which instantly lends an interesting art-house effect to your home movies, the self-timer can be used, and the Wind-cut function reduces the unwanted intrusion of wind noise.

You can use a zoom lens during recording with focusing set as for still images by half-pressing the shutter button. On the negative side, you’ll find that if you choose continuous auto-focus, areas of the video will be blurred before becoming sharp again as the camera tries to refocus and the noise of the AF system is a little intrusive. Using manual focus is trickier but will ultimately produce better looking and sounding movies. On a more positive note, having the AF system is better than not being able to auto-focus at all, as with all current DSLR cameras that offer video recording. Hand-holding the NX10 during movie recording inevitably leads to obvious shake, so for best results you’ll need a dedicated video tripod.

The main menu system on the NX10 is very straight-forward to use and is accessed by pressing the Menu button to the left of the EVF. There are seven main menus presented as a row of horizontal icons, much like Canon’s DSLR camera range. As mentioned previously, the Fn button speeds up access to some of the more commonly used options. Due to the large LCD screen and restricting the number of on-screen choices to six, the various options and icons are clear and legible. If you have never used a digital camera before, or you’re upgrading from a more basic model, reading the easy-to-follow manual before you start is a good idea. Unfortunately Samsung have chosen not to supply it in printed format, so you can’t carry it with you for easy reference.

The start-up time from turning the NX10 on to being ready to take a photo is impressively quick at around 1 second, and as I’ve already mentioned the Contrast Auto-Focusing system is as fast as most DSLRs. The NX10 usually achieves focus most of the time with any of the three lenses available on launch, helped by the AF assist lamp – the NX10 doesn’t have any notable problems locking onto the subject in low-light situations. It takes about 1 second to store a JPEG image, allowing you to keep shooting as they are being recorded onto the memory card, with a brief LCD blackout between each image. Storing a single RAW image takes around 4 seconds, but thankfully it doesn’t lock up the camera in any way – you can use the menu system or shoot another image while the first file is being written to memory. The Samsung NX10 has quite a good Burst mode which enables you to take 3 frames per second for an unlimited number of JPEG images at the highest image quality, or 5 RAW images. The interesting Burst modes shoots at 30fps for 30 shots with a single press of the shutter button, but only for 1.4 megapixel JPEGs.

Once you have captured a photo the Samsung NX10 has a fairly good range of options when it comes to playing, reviewing and managing your images. You can instantly scroll through the images that you have taken, view thumbnails (up to 20 onscreen at the same time), zoom in and out up to 7.2x magnification, view slideshows, delete and protect an image and set the print order. The Image Edit option offers a number of different ways to alter the look of an already-captured photo, including redeye fix, backlight, changing the photo style, resizing, rotating and face retouch. The Info button toggles detailed settings information about each picture on and off, such as the ISO rating and aperture / shutter speed, there are small brightness and RGB histograms available, and the Highlight option makes any blown-out highlights areas flash on the LCD screen.

In summary the NX10 is a very impressive first attempt at a completely new kind of camera for Samsung, with a logical user interface that isn’t too daunting for beginners or too dumbed-down for the more experienced photographer. Now let’s find out if the APS-C sensor can deliver on the Image Quality front…

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Image Quality

All of the sample images in this Review were taken using the 14.6 megapixel SuperFine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 5.5Mb.

The Samsung NX10 produced images of excellent quality during the review period. The large 14.6 megapixel APS-C CMOS megapixel sensor used in the NX10 produces noise-free JPEG images at ISO 100-400, with ISO 800 also looking good. ISO 1600 only shows a little noise, while the fastest setting of ISO 3200 is quite a lot noisier and suffers from softening of fine detail and a loss of saturation, but the images are still perfectly usable for small prints and resizing for web use. The NX10 does apply quite a lot of noise reduction to the JPEGs, as demonstrated by the RAW files which have more noise at the comparable high ISO settings.

The images were a little soft straight out of the NX10 at the default sharpening setting and ideally require some further sharpening in an application like Adobe Photoshop, or you can change the in-camera setting for JPEG files. Colours were vibrant without being over-saturated in the default Standard Picture Wizard mode, and you can always choose Vivid if you want even more punch or one of the other seven presets to change the mood of your JPEG images, with three customisable settings alo available.

The built-in pop-up flash worked well indoors, with no red-eye and adequate exposure. The night photograph was excellent, with the maximum shutter speed of 30 seconds and bulb mode of 8 minutes allowing you to capture plenty of light. Smart Range is quite a useful feature that increases visible detail in both highlight and shadow areas of the image, albeit at the expense of reducing the colour saturation a little.

Noise

There are 6 ISO settings available on the Samsung NX10. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting, with JPEG on the left and RAW on the right.

JPEG RAW

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

File Quality

The Samsung NX10 has 3 different JPEG image quality settings available, with SuperFine being the highest quality option, and you can also shoot in RAW format. Here are some 100% crops which show the quality of the various options, with the file size shown in brackets.

14M SuperFine (4.9Mb) (100% Crop) 14M Fine (2.8Mb) (100% Crop)
   
14M Normal (1.9Mb) (100% Crop) 14M RAW (25.8Mb) (100% Crop)

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web – Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images are a little soft at the default sharpening setting and benefit from some further sharpening in a program like Adobe Photoshop. You can also change the in-camera sharpening level.

Original (100% Crop)

Sharpened (100% Crop)

   

Flash

The flash settings on the Samsung NX10 are Smart Flash, Auto, Auto + Red-eye reduction, Fill-in, Fill-in + Red-eye reduction, 1st Curtain, 2nd Curtain, and Off. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Off (46mm)

Fill-in (46mm)

ISO 64 ISO 64

And here are some portrait shots. As you can see, neither the Fill-in or the Fill-in + Red-eye reduction settings caused any red-eye.

Fill-in

Fill-in (100% Crop)
   

Fill-in + Red-eye reduction

Fill-in + Red-eye reduction (100% Crop)

Night

The Samsung NX10’s maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds and there’s also a Bulb setting of up to 8 minutes, which is great news if you’re seriously interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 25 seconds at ISO 100. I’ve included a 100% crop of the image to show what the quality is like. The camera takes the same amount of time again to apply noise reduction, so for example at the 15 second setting the actual exposure takes 30 seconds.

Night Shot

Night Shot (100% Crop)

Picture Wizard

Samsung’s various Picture Wizard options are similar to Olympus’ Picture Modes, Nikon’s Picture Styles and Canon’s Picture Controls, offering preset combinations of different sharpness, contrast, saturation and colour tone settings, all of which can be changed. The nine available Picture Controls are shown below in the following series, which demonstrates the differences. There are also three additional Custom styles so that you can create your own looks.

Standard

Vivid

   

Standard

Vivid

   

Forest

Retro

   

Classic

Calm

   

Cool

 
 

Smart Range

The Smart Range feature noticeably increases the visible detail in both shadow and highlight areas, as shown in the example below, although it does tend to wash-out the stronger colours in the process.

On

Off

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Sample Images

This is a selection of sample images from the Samsung NX10 camera, which were all taken using the 14.6 megapixel SuperFine JPEG setting. The thumbnails below link to the full-sized versions, which have not been altered in any way.

Sample RAW Images

The Samsung NX10 enables users to capture RAW and JPEG format files. We’ve provided some Samsung RAW (SRW) samples for you to download (thumbnail images shown below are not 100% representative).

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/15s · f/2 · 46mm · ISO 400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/80s · f/4 · 46mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/160s · f/5.6 · 84mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/160s · f/5.6 · 84mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/40s · f/8 · 27mm · ISO 240
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

25/1s · f/8 · 27mm · ISO 100
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/40s · f/8 · 27mm · ISO 120
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/640s · f/5.6 · 223mm · ISO 400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/350s · f/5.6 · 308mm · ISO 200
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/750s · f/5.6 · 308mm · ISO 1600
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/320s · f/5.6 · 308mm · ISO 400
Download Original

Sample RAW Image

Download

1/180s · f/8 · 231mm · ISO 3200
Download Original

Sample Movie

This is a sample movie at the quality setting of 1280×720 at 30 frames per second. Please note that this 15 second movie is 17.5Mb in size.

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

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Product Images

Samsung NX10

Front of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Front of the Camera / Lens Attached

 
Samsung NX10

Pop-up Flash

 
Samsung NX10

Isometric View

 
Samsung NX10

Isometric View

 
Samsung NX10

Rear of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Rear of the Camera / Image Displayed

 
Samsung NX10

Rear of the Camera / Turned On

 
Samsung NX10

Rear of the Camera / Main Menu

 

Samsung NX10

Rear of the Camera / Fn Menu

 
Samsung NX10

Top of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Bottom of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Side of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Side of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Front of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Front of the Camera

 
Samsung NX10

Memory Card Slot

 
Samsung NX10

Battery Compartment

 
Samsung NX10

Lenses

 
Samsung NX10

Lenses

 
Samsung NX10

30mm Pancake Lens

 
Samsung NX10

30mm Pancake Lens

 
Samsung NX10

18-55mm Lens

 
Samsung NX10

18-55mm Lens

 
Samsung NX10

50-200mm Lens

 
Samsung NX10

50-200mm Lens

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Specifications

Image sensor Type CMOS
Effective Pixel Approx. 14.6 Mega-pixels
Total Pixel Approx. 15.1 Mega-pixels
Lens Mount SAMSUNG NX Mount
Usable Lens SAMSUNG Lenses for SAMSUNG NX Mount
Viewfinder Viewfinder EVF
Field of View Approx. 100%
Magnification Approx. 0.86x (APS-C, 50mm, -1m-1)
Focusing Type Contrast AF
Modes Single AF, Continuous AF, MF
Exposure Compensation ±3 EV (1/2EV, 1/3EV step)
ISO Equivalent Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 (1EV step)
Modes Single, Continuous, Burst, Self-timer, Bracket (AE, WB, PW)
Metering System Metering : Multi, Center-weighted, Spot Metering range : EV0 ~ 18 (ISO100•30mm F2.0)
AE Lock AEL Button
Shutter Type Electronically controlled vertical-run focal plane shutter
Speed Auto?1/4000sec. ~ 30sec.
Manual?1/4000sec. ~ 30sec. (1/3EV or 1/2EV step)
Bulb (Limit time : 8 min)
Flash Modes Smart Flash, Auto, Auto + Red-eye reduction, Fill-in, Fill-in + Red-eye reduction, 1st Curtain, 2nd Curtain, OFF
Type TTL Auto Pop-up flash
Guide Number 11 (at ISO 100)
Angle of View Coverage 28mm wide-angle (Equivalent to 35mm)
Sync. Speed Less than 1/180sec.
External Flash SAMSUNG External Flash available (SEF-42A, SEF-20A : Optional)
Effect Picture Wizard Yes
White Balance Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent (W, N, D), Tungsten, Flash, Custom, K(Manual)
Storage Media SD, SDHC
File format RAW (SRW), JPEG (EXIF 2.21), DCF, DPOF 1.1,
PictBridge 1.0
Capacity (512MB) 14M : RAW 35
14M : Super Fine 142, Fine 278, Normal 408
10M : Super Fine 197, Fine 382, Normal 724
6M : Super Fine 322, Fine 615, Normal 1128
2M : Super Fine 738, Fine 1334, Normal 2238
Burst (1.4M) : Super Fine 1201, Fine 2092, Normal 3320
12M(W) : Super Fine 168, Fine 328, Normal 630
8M(W) : Super Fine 234, Fine 454, Normal 860
5M(W) : Super Fine 381, Fine 727, Normal 1334
2M(W) : Super Fine 872, Fine 1573, Normal 2638
Movie : 1280×720 : High Quality 15min., Normal 22min.
640×480 : High Quality 44min., Normal 66min.
320×240 : High Quality 145min., Normal 210min
Image Play Editing Red eye fix, Back light comp., Photo Style Selector, Resize, Rotate, Face Retouch
Type Single image, Thumbnails (3/9/20 images), Slide show, Movie
Shooting Modes Smart Auto, Program, Shutter Priority AE, Aperture Priority AE, Manual, Night, Portrait, Landscape, Scene, Movie
Drive Modes Smart Auto, Program, Shutter Priority AE, Aperture Priority AE, Manual, Night, Portrait, Landscape, Scene, Movie
Interface Digital output connector USB 2.0 (HI-SPEED)
Video Output NTSC, PAL (user selectable)
HDMI 1.3 : (1080i, 720P, 576P / 480P)
DC Power Input Connector DC 9.0V, 1.5A (100 ~ 240V)
Power Supply Power Source Rechargeable battery : BP1310 (1300mAh)
Charger: BC1310
AC Adaptor : AD9NX01 (Optional)
Battery Life 200min/400shots (CIPA Standard)
Physical Specification Dimensions (WxHxD) 123×87×39.8mm (excluding the projecting parts of the camera)
Weight 353g (without batteries and card)
Operating Temperature 0 ~ 40 °C
Operating Humidity 5 ~ 85%
Software Application SAMSUNG Master, SAMSUNG RAW Converter 3.1
Adobe Reader, QuickTime Player 7.6

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Conclusion

The Samsung NX10 is an excellent first entry into the growing interchangeable lens compact camera market, offering intuitive handling, especially for beginners, great image quality and fantastic value for money. Only the proprietary and physically larger NX lenses detract from what is a very serious contender to the Micro Four Thirds cameras.

I’ve rarely reviewed a first-generation product that is quite as well-designed as the NX10. Everything about it, from the conventional yet stylish DSLR-like design, logical user interface and excellent build quality is testament to the lavish attention that Samsung have obviously invested (not to mention the cost). The NX10 may not be quite as slim as the smallest Micro Four Third models from Olympus and Panasonic, but it does offer a useful handgrip and even more useful built-in viewfinder. The all-plastic construction doesn’t affect the overall quality feel too much, and it ensures that Samsung can offer the NX10 at a very tempting price which seriously undercuts its main rivals.

The NX10 also offers all the advantages that a large APS-C DSLR sensor offers, namely better performance at higher ISOs than the smaller Micro Four Thirds format. I’d be happy to regularly shoot with any setting from 100-800, and even 1600 is handy at a push when you want natural results without having to resort to the built-in flash. Note that the RAW files are massive, weighing in at 25Mb each, which is as large as files from the 21 megapixel Canon EOS 5D Mark II!

While the results from the NX10 are clearly a step above the MFT cameras, you will have to compromise on the size of the camera system. The tiny 30mm pancake lens is fine, but the 18-55mm and 50-200mm are substantially bigger than their Panasonic and Olympus equivalents. This could be a problem for a system that’s being promoted as a half-way house between a compact and a DSLR, although they certainly aren’t as large as similar DSLR lenses. The movie mode is also not quite as sophisticated as either the Panasonic GH1 or the Olympus E-PL1, with no stereo sound or option to connect a microphone, no one-touch record button and no ability to change the shutter speed or take a still image during recording.

The excellent electronic viewfinder and even better AMOLED screen are real attractions, even if the latter is fixed rather than the swiveling type. Combined with the fast auto-focus system, which is easily on a par with the Panasonic Lumix G cameras, you could be forgiven for thinking that you’re shooting with a DSLR camera rather than a mere “compact”. The Samsung NX10 really does look, feel and behave like a proper DSLR that’s been shrunk in the wash.

The Samsung NX10 also represents excellent value for money, even though it’s only just been launched in the UK and Europe. If you shop around £700 will buy you the body and all three lenses, an incredibly good deal that’s several hundreds of pounds cheaper than the Panasonic and Olympus equivalent. The NX10 is by far the cheapest way into the new mirror-less, interchangeable lens format (which still needs a snappier name).

So, if you don’t mind buying into the closed Samsung system (and why should you when there are 5 more lenses on the way this year alone), and you can live with the slightly bigger lenses, then the NX10 is well worth your close attention and well worth our Highly Recommended award.

4.5 stars

Ratings (out of 5)
Design 4.5
Features 4
Ease-of-use 4
Image quality 5
Value for money 5

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

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Main Rivals

Listed below are some of the rivals of the Samsung NX10.

Canon EOS 500D

Canon EOS 500D Review thumbnail

The Canon EOS 500D is the latest DSLR camera to jump on the HD video bandwagon, offering 1080p and 720p quality settings. Also known as the Digital Rebel T1i, the successor to the EOS 450D features a 15 megapixel CMOS sensor, 940,000 dot 3-inch LCD screen, Live View and ISO range of 100-12800. At $799.99 / £869.99 body only or $899.99 / £969.99 with the EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS kit lens, find out if the Canon EOS 500D is the best consumer digital SLR in our expert review.

Canon PowerShot G11

Canon PowerShot G11 Review thumbnail

The PowerShot G11 is the latest version of Canon’s compact camera range for prosumers and professionals, offering a DSLR experience in a pocketable body. Interestingly Canon have reduced the number of megapixels on the G11 in a bid to improve image quality at higher ISO speeds, and they’ve responded to customer feedback by re-introducing the vari-angle LCD that was missing on the previous G10 model. With a price-tag of £569.00 / €659.00 / $499.99, the Canon PowerShot G11 is one of the most expensive digital compact cameras that money can buy – Gavin Stoker finds out if it’s also one of the best…

Nikon D5000

Nikon D5000 Review thumbnail

The Nikon D5000 is the latest digital SLR camera to incorporate a video recording mode, capable of producing 720p, 1280×720 pixel movies at 30fps complete with sound. The 12.3 megapixel D5000 also features a vari-angle LCD screen, making unusual picture compostions easier than with a fixed screen. More traditional SLR features include an ISO range of 100-6400, 4fps continuous shooting, and 11-point autofocus system. Retailing for £719.99 / €878.00 / $729.95 body only, or £799.99 / €972.00 / $849.95 with the 18-55mm VR kit lens, we find out if the Nikon D5000 can successfuly combine video and still images in our latest expert review.

Olympus E-P1

Olympus E-P1 Review thumbnail

The Olympus E-P1 brings together the image quality and interchangeable lenses of a digital SLR, the video capability of a camcorder, and the size and portability of a point and shoot, all in one compact package. The first Micro Four Thirds model from Olympus is inspired by the popular 1950’s PEN series of film cameras, but is very much a product of the new millennium, offering a wealth of up-to-date must-have features. Mark Goldstein finds out if the E-P1 really is all the camera you will ever need in our latest expert review.

Olympus E-P2

Olympus E-P2 Review thumbnail

Olympus have expanded their Micro Four Thirds family with the launch of the E-P2. Heavily promoted in a series of eye-catching adverts fronted by none other than Kevin Spacey, the E-P2 adds a smattering of new features to the existing E-P1. These include an optional electronic viewfinder, two new Art Filters, the ability to record movies in Manual mode, and a sober all-black finish. Gavin Stoker finds out if the Olympus E-P2 really is a camera for everyone in our latest expert review.

Olympus E-PL1

Olympus E-PL1 Review thumbnail

Small cameras with big sensors are set to be the future of photography – at least, that’s what Olympus think as they introduce the E-PL1, their brand new PEN camera for the mass-market. Cheaper, smaller, lighter and easier to use than most rival models, the Olympus E-PL1 is firmly aimed at frustrated compact camera owners who crave more control and better results, but who are put off by bulky and complicated DSLRs. The full-featured E-PL1 should also appeal to experienced prosumers looking for a cheaper way into Micro Four Thirds. Read the World’s first online Olympus E-PL1 review to find out if it strikes the right balance between affordability and functionality.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 Review thumbnail

The new Lumix DMC-GF1 camera seamlessly combines the image quality and features of a DSLR with the handling and ease-of-use of a compact – at least that’s what Panasonic is trying to achieve. With a 12 megapixel sensor, 3 inch LCD, high-definition video and wealth of shooting modes for beginners and more advanced users, can the diminutive Panasonic GF1 live up to all the pre-release hype? Mark Goldstein discovers if this is THE camera of 2009…

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 Review thumbnail

The new Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 is a new DSLR-like camera that can shoot both still photos and high-definition video. Based on the Micro Four Thirds standard, the Panasonic GH1 takes all the good points of the original G1 camera and adds a plethora of advanced movie-making functionality into the mix. Available now in black, red and gold for $1499.95 / £1299.99, Mark Goldstein finds out if the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 is the best ever DSLR / video camera.

Pentax K-x

Pentax K-x Review thumbnail

Pentax have been producing excellent DSLR cameras for some time now, and their latest model, the K-x model, is certainly no exception. The small and lightweight 12 megapixel Pentax Kx has a wealth of features, including 4.7fps continuous shooting, 11-point auto-focus, high-definition video, auto modes for beginners and manual modes for experts. With an official price of £599.99 / $599.95, the K-x also won’t break the bank. Mark Goldstein finds out if the new Pentax Kx deserves a place on your DSLR short-list…

Sony A380

Sony A380 Review thumbnail

Sony have revamped their entry- and mid-range DSLR cameras for 2009, with the A380 replacing the A350 as the most sophisticated model. The Sony A380 retains all the key features of its predecessor – 2.7 inch tilting LCD screen, Live View, anti-dust system, ISO range of 100-3200, body anti-shake system, eye-start auto-focus system and Dynamic Range Optimiser – whilst updating the design and user interface to supposedly make it easier to use. Find out if Sony’s designers have been successful by reading our in-depth review of the £700 / $850 Sony A380 DSLR.

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Samsung NX10 Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

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