Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Introduction

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V is a travel-zoom camera that’s positioned as a more affordable alternative to the raneg-topping HX20V. The key differences between the two models are a 16x zoom rather than 20X, 1080 60/50i vs. 60/50p video, no manual focus, a shorter flash range, 5cm vs. 1cm macro, 2-way vs. 3-way image stabilizer, no custom button, and a slimmer body. Otherwise the HX10V is identical, offering a 16x, 24-384mm zoom lens, 18.2 megapixel back-illuminated Exmor R CMOS sensor and built-in GPS tracking complete with a compass, the HX10V also has full 1080 60/50i high-definition video recording with stereo sound and HDMI output and 3D Sweep Panoramas and 3D Still Images. Other key features of the Sony HX10V include a 3 inch LCD screen with 921,000-dots, fast 0.13 second auto-focusing, 10fps burst shooting mode at full resolution, ISO range of 100-12800, Optical SteadyShot with Active Mode, Intelligent Auto Plus, Program and full Manual shooting modes, artistic Picture Effect modes, Intelligent Sweep Panoramas, and support for both Memory Stick PRO Duo and Secure Digital cards. The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V is available in black for around £259.99 / $329.99.

Ease of Use

The DSC-HX10V is Sony’s latest travel-zoom camera, following 2011’s popular HX9V model. Travel-zooms now typically offer at least a 16x or bigger lens in a compact body that you can still fit inside a pocket, with some models upping the ante to a 20x lens. The Sony DSC-HX10V joins the party with a 16x, 24-384mm extending optical lens with respectable maximum apertures of f/3.2 at the 24mm wide-angle setting and f/5.9 at the 384mm full telephoto setting.

The HX10V’s lens is a real joy to use, with a 16x zoom in such a slim package making this camera very adaptable, with everything from ultra-wide landscapes to candid long-distance portraits within easy reach. The 24mm focal length provides an entirely new wide angle of view that can only increase your creativity. You won’t want to go back to a “standard” 35mm zoom after using the 24mm lens on the DSC-HX10V, or even a 28mm one – 4mm at the wide-angle end really does make a big difference.

Even when set to 384mm, the lens doesn’t extend too far from the front of the HX10V, making it look to all intents and purposes like a “normal” compact camera. The combination of the f/3.3 aperture, effective optical image stabilizer and maximum ISO speed of 12800 makes this camera well suited to hand-held low-light photography, not to mention the wealth of dedicated shooting modes. Sony has fitted a dual image stabilisation mechanism in the shape of both optical SteadyShot and an ISO range that extends up to ISO 12800, much you’ll find on your average point-and-shoot. Note that as with most recent Cyber-shots, you can’t actually turn off the SteadyShot function, Sony assuming that it’s better turned on permanently.

Despite its big zoom lens, the HX10V is still a slender camera, measuring just under 3cms at its narrowest point and weighing 234g with the battery and memory card fitted, with a large 3-inch, 921k-dot resolution LCD screen at the rear As you’d expect with a screen of that size on such a small camera, the HX10V has no optical viewfinder to fall back on in brighter lighting conditions.

Providing the means of gripping the camera is a textured, rubberised protrusion on the front and a small thumb-shaped lozenge on the rear, making the DSC-HX10V easy to get to grips with despite its mostly smooth plastic surface. Also located on the front of the HX10V is the centrally located lens and a porthole on the left for the self-timer/AF illuminator. There’s a pop-up flash unit on top of the camera which is automatically raised when you select a flash mode.

Press the small On/Off button on the top plate and the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V quickly readies itself for action in a just over a second. The adequately sized shutter-release button has a definite halfway point, very quickly determining focus and exposure with a bleep of affirmation even in low-light, focus points highlighted as green rectangles on the LCD. Go on to take the shot and the JPEG images are committed to memory in a single second, the screen momentarily blanking out and then displaying the captured image before the user can go on to take a second shot.

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V
Front Rear

The shutter release button is encircled by a responsive forefinger-operated push/pull rocker zoom lever, with the camera taking around three seconds to zoom from wide-angle to full telephoto. The HX10V’s twin built-in stereo microphones are also located on top of the camera.

A round shooting mode dial with a knurled edge and positive action completes the HX10V’s top-plate, letting you quickly switch between the various shooting modes that are on offer. Sony has included Intelligent Auto scene recognition, which works in virtually identical fashion to the intelligent auto modes of Panasonic’s and Canon’s compact ranges. Simply point the HX10V at a scene or subject and the camera analyses it and automatically chooses one of 11 pre-optimised settings to best suit. There’s also the Superior Auto mode, which places greater emphasis on reducing blur and noise and increasing the dynamic range.

Adding to the HX10V’s snapshot simplicity, these features accompany face recognition and smile shutter functionality on board, the former mode biasing human faces in the frame and the latter mode firing the shutter when it detects a smiling subject. The Face Detection system automatically adjusts the focus, exposure and white balance for people in the frame, and can even be set to distinguish between children and adults. Smile Detection offers three self-explanatory options, Big, Normal and Slight. Used in conjunction, the Face and Smile Detection systems do result in more hits than misses, especially in contrasty lighting conditions, although all those smiling faces could ultimately freak you out a little! The self-portrait options in the self-timer menu work by automatically taking the shot with a two second delay after either one or two people have entered the frame.

In addition to the regular Program mode, which provides the full range of camera options and additionally allows you to change settings like the ISO speed and metering, is the welcome inclusion of a fully Manual mode that lets you independently set the aperture and shutter speed, which will instantly appeal to the more experienced photographer. The range of apertures on offer is unfortunately rather limited to just two settings at either end of the lens (f/3.3 or f/8.0 at 24mm and f/5.9 or f/14 at 384mm) with the camera employing a built-in Neutral Density filer, but the ability to choose from 30 – 1/1600th second shutter speeds and set both the aperture and shutter speed if you wish opens up a lot of creative potential. Sadly there are no Aperture or Shutter priority modes, which would have narrowed the skill gap between Program and Manual, and there’s no support for the RAW file format either, which would really have been the icing on the cake for serious photographers looking for a backup-pocket camera to their DSLR.

The Intelligent Sweep Panorama mode lets you capture a panoramic image very easily without the use of a tripod. All you need to decide is whether you would like to start from left or right, top or bottom. Then press and hold down the shutter release while doing a “sweep” with the camera in hand. Exposure compensation is available before you start the sweep, but the exposure is fixed once you depress the shutter button. After you are done with the sweeping, the camera does all the processing required, and presents you with a finished panoramic image. There are three modes, Standard, Wide and High Resolution, with the latter mode successfully stitching together a 42.9 megapixel image – not bad for a humble compact! Note that if you do the sweeping too slowly, or you let go of the shutter release button too early, the panorama will be truncated.

For those who like a healthy dose of gimmickry with their gadgets, the HX10V offers a 3D still image mode – an addition to the now expected 3D Sweep Panorama mode and the ‘cheat’ of the lenticular print-like Sweep Multi Angle mode, also again featured here. This option doesn’t require two lenses and two sensors to produce a stereoscopic image. Instead the Sony takes two consecutive shots from two different vantage positions and combines them for its 3D effect. Like all of its stereoscopic rivals you’ll still need a 3D equipped TV to properly view the results.

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V
Pop-up Flash Side

In the Hand-held Twilight and Anti Motion Blur shooting modes, the DSC-HX10V takes six shots in a rapid sequence, typically at a high sensitivity setting and a (relatively) fast shutter speed, and then combines them into a single image that has somewhat less noise than a single shot taken at the same ISO and exposure settings. In our experience, the difference between the two modes is that in Anti Motion Blur mode, the camera is more willing to pick a really high ISO setting like ISO 1600 to maintain a fast shutter speed, whereas in Hand-held Twilight mode, it will only go as high as absolutely necessary to avoid camera shake at the chosen focal length. If light levels are truly low, however, the HX10V will pick a high ISO speed even in this mode.

Backlight Correction HDR is a feature where the HX10V automatically shoots two frames quick succession, varying the exposure for each one then combining them to create a single image with the most detail possible in both the shadows and highlights. You can see from the example on the Image Quality page that this feature produces a photo with noticeably more dynamic range than one taken using one of the standard shooting modes, but at the same time without replicating the often “false” look of many HDR programs. Note that you should mount the camera on a tripod to avoid any unwanted camera-shake, and we were disappointed that you can only turn Backlight Correction HDR on or off, with no options for varying the intensity of the effect. Background Defocus attempts to mimic the sharp subject and out-of-focus background effect that DSLR owners typically enjoy, again shooting two frames in quick succession but this time varying the aperture.

Present and correct is the increasingly ubiquitous ability to shoot High Definition video clips at full 1080i HD with stereo sound rather than mono. The various options are 1920×1280 or 1440×1280 pixels at 60/50i in the AVCHD format, and 1440×1280, 1280×720 or 640×480 pixels at 30/25fps in the MPEG4 format. During video recording you can take a 13 megapixel still image by pressing the shutter button, or alternatively grab a still from your video footage during playback.

There is full use of the 16x optical zoom during recording so you can really make the most of that massive focal range, plus the ability to change the EV level, white balance, and metering options and turn on either standard SteadyShot or the Active Mode mode, which provides up to 10x more effectiveness with no side-effects. There’s also a direct HDMI output from the camera, useful for playing back your footage on a HDTV set, although sadly there’s no HDMI cable supplied in the box. The dedicated Movie button on the rear of the DSC-HX10V allows you to start recording a movie with a single push of a button, and then stop recording by pressing the same button – a lot more intuitive than having to select the movie mode then press the shutter button, as on most compacts. You can also activate the movie mode via the Shooting Mode dial.

GPS is a feature that has slowly but surely been finding its way into digital cameras as the technology has got smaller and cheaper to implement, making its debut on last year’s HX5 and unsurprisingly being retained by the HX10V. This potentially allows you to seamlessly geo-tag your photos (latitude and longitude co-ordinates are stored in the EXIF data) and then sort and display them using geo-friendly websites such as Google Earth and Google Maps or the supplied Picture Motion Browser PC software. The HX10V also uses the GPS to keep the camera time accurate, has a built-in compass that shows shows which direction you were pointing when the picture was taken, and can plot your progress using the new GPS Log Recording function even if the camera is turned off.

The GPS function can be manually turned on or off and the current GPS status is displayed as a small icon on the LCD screen. Three bars appear next to the icon when the GPS has synced with one or more satellites, which unfortunately takes a few minutes from powering on the camera. Thankfully once it’s synced, the HX10V’s GPS receiver works a lot better than most other GPS-capable cameras that we’ve reviewed, saving accurate positioning information for the majority of the images that we shot in built-up central London, making this camera much more useful for urban photographers. The main downside of the HX10V’s GPS is the subsequent drain on battery life, with the camera only managing just over 300 shots with GPS turned on instead of the 400 that it can manage without.

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V
Memory Card Slot Battery Compartment

The rear of the DSC-HX10V is dominated by the large 3 inch LCD screen, with the resolution a satisfyingly high-res 912k dots. To the right of the screen is the useful one-touch movie record button and a small button for playing back your images. Users have the ability to dip in and out of created folders of images or the calendar view, view thumbnails, select slideshows and choose transitional effects and accompanying music, or delete shots. Press the shutter button halfway and you’re helpfully catapulted back into capture mode. And that’s basically it. With a press of the Menu button in playback, users have access to a few in-camera retouching effects, including the ability to crop and sharpen an image and apply red-eye correction.

Underneath the Playback button is a traditional round navigation pad which you can use to navigate through menus and options, in conjunction with the small button in the middle which activates whatever it is you’ve chosen. The four directions on the navigation pad also provide a quick way of setting the Display, Flash, the new Photo Creativity interface and Continuous Shooting/Timer options. The Photo Creativity makes it easier for beginners to change the colour, brightness, vividness and Picture effect modes, with changes previewed in real time on the LCD screen.

Finally, there are buttons for the camera’s menu system and for deleting images underneath the navigation pad. The menu button accesses most of the camera’s main functions – image size, burst settings, bracketing, exposure compensation, ISO, white balance, focus mode, metering, smile detection, and face detection – plus an icon at the bottom to open the four Settings menus. The latter includes the ability to deactivate the camera’s ‘bleep’ that otherwise sounds at every button press, choose the movie format and activate red-eye reduction if required.

The navigation pad also doubles up as a control ring that’s used to set the aperture and shutter speed in the Manual shooting mode, amongst other things. The ring is a little small and over-sensitive, and having to press the tiny central button to toggle between the ISO speed, shutter speed and aperture quickly becomes a bit tiresome, but the ability to take full control of the HX10V is still very welcome.

Pressing the drive mode button brings up two options, single or burst, with high-, mid- and low-speed continuous options then available in the Menu system. Out of these, the high-speed continuous mode is the most remarkable. The HX10V takes up to 10 full-resolution photos at a frankly astounding 10 frames per second, which is faster than most compact cameras and indeed most DSLRs too. The only fly in the ointment is that once the burst is completed, it takes over fifteen seconds for the camera to clear the buffer, during which you cannot take another picture. In the other two continuous shooting modes, the Sony HX10V also takes up to 10 pictures, but at slower speeds of 5 or 2 frames per second.

The bottom of the Sony HX10V features a standard metal screw thread for attaching it to a tripod which is conveniently located in the centre. A plastic cover protects the lithium-ion battery and the removable memory card, with the HX10V supporting the SD / SDHC / SDXC format in addition to Sony’s own proprietary Pro Duo Memory Stick format. There’s also a hardly worth it 11MB internal memory to fall back on which can store 7 full-resolution still images. The right side of the HX10V has a small metal eyelet for the supplied wrist strap and also the HDMI port underneath a sturdy plastic cover, while there are no controls on the left side (looking from the rear).

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 18 megapixel JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 5Mb.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V produced images of very good quality during the review period. This camera handled noise well, not becoming obvious until ISO 800, and then becoming progressively worse at the faster settings of ISO 1600 and 3200, an excellent performance for such a small image sensor with such a high pixel count. It’s not really worth using the fastest 6400 and 12800 speeds though.

Chromatic aberrations were in evidence but were well-controlled, with some limited purple fringing effects appearing in high contrast situations. The 18 megapixel images were a little soft straight out of the camera at the default sharpen setting and require some further sharpening in an application like Adobe Photoshop, or you can increase the in-camera sharpening level.

Macro performance is good, allowing you to focus as close as 5cm away from the subject. Commendably barrel distortion is well controlled even at the 24mm wide-angle focal length of the 16x zoom lens. The built-in flash worked well indoors, with no red-eye and adequate overall exposure. The maximum shutter speed of 30 seconds allows the cameras to capture enough light for most after-dark situations.

The Backlight Correction HDR feature dramatically increases the detail in the shadow and highlight areas, although we miss being able to choose just how much correction is applied. There’s a good range of Color Modes and Picture Effects on offer, while the Sweep Panorama mode makes it simple to take wide-vista shots.

Noise

There are 8 ISO settings available on the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting.

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

Focal Range

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V’s 16x zoom lens offers a versatile focal range, as illustrated by these examples:

24mm

384mm

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web – Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images are just a little soft and ideally benefit from some further sharpening in a program like Adobe Photoshop. Alternatively you can change the in-camera sharpening level.

Original (100% Crop)

Sharpened (100% Crop)

   

Chromatic Aberrations

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V handled chromatic aberrations well during the review, with some purple fringing present around the edges of objects in high-contrast situations, as shown in the examples below.

Chromatic Aberrations 1 (100% Crop)

Chromatic Aberrations 2 (100% Crop)

Macro

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V allows you to focus on a subject that is 5cms away from the camera when the lens is set to wide-angle. The first image shows how close you can get to the subject (in this case a compact flash card). The second image is a 100% crop.

Macro

Macro (100% Crop)

Flash

The flash settings on the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V are Auto, Forced Flash, Slow Syncro, No Flash, with a Red-eye Reduction option in the Main menu. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Suppressed Flash – Wide Angle (24mm)

Forced Flash – Wide Angle (24mm)

ISO 64 ISO 64
   

Suppressed Flash – Telephoto (384mm)

Forced Flash – Telephoto (384mm)

ISO 64 ISO 64

And here are some portrait shots. As you can see, both the Forced Flash setting and the Red-Eye Correction option caused a tiny amount of red-eye.

Forced Flash

Forced Flash (100% Crop)
   

Red-eye Reduction

Red-eye Reduction (100% Crop)

Night

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V’s maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds in the Manual mode, which is great news if you’re seriously interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 25 seconds at ISO 100. I’ve included a 100% crop of the image to show what the quality is like.

Night

Night (100% Crop)

Background Defocus

Background Defocus attempts to mimic the sharp subject and out-of-focus background effect that DSLR owners typically enjoy, shooting two frames in quick succession and varying the aperture between each one.

On

On (100% Crop)

Backlight Correction HDR

DRO is Sony’s solution for improving shadow and highlight detail in photos taken in contrasty light, significantly increasing the image’s dynamic range. The examples show the rather dramatic effect of turning this feature on.

Off

On

Color Modes

There are 5 Color Mode preset effects that you can use to change the look of your images.

Standard

Vivid

   

Real

Sepia

   

B/W

 
 

Picture Effects

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V offers a range of 9 creative Picture Effects.

Off

HDR Painting

   

Rich-tone Monochrome

Miniature

   

Toy Camera

Pop Color

   

Partial Color (Red)

Soft High-key

   

Watercolor

Illustration

Intelligent Sweep Panorama

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V allows you to take panoramic images very easily, by ‘sweeping’ with the camera while keeping the shutter release depressed. The camera does all the processing and stitching and even successfully compensates for moving subjects, with the new High Resolution mode successfully creating a 40+ megapixel image.

Standard
 
Wide
 
High Resolution

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Sample Images

This is a selection of sample images from the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V camera, which were all taken using the 18 megapixel JPEG setting. The thumbnails below link to the full-sized versions, which have not been altered in any way.

Sample Movie

This is a sample video from the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V camera at the highest quality setting of 1920×1080 pixels at 25 frames per second. Please note that this 21 second movie is 56.6Mb in size.

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

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Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

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Product Images

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Front of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Front of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Lens Extended

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Front of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Flash Raised

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Side of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Side of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Rear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Rear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Image Displayed

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Rear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Turned On

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Rear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Main Menu

 

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Rear of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V / Main Menu

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Top of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Bottom of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Side of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Side of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Front of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Front of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Memory Card Slot

 
Sony CyberShot DSC-HX10V

Battery Compartment

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

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Specifications

Lens

Optical Zoom 16x
Clear Image Zoom 32x
Digital Zoom 18M Approx.64x / 10M Approx.85x / 5M Approx.120x / VGA Approx.244x / 13M(16:9) Approx.64x / 2M(16:9) Approx.163x
F F3.3(W)-5.9(T)
Focal Length (f= mm) f=4.28-68.48mm
Focal Length (f=35mm conversion) f=24-384mm
Macro (cm) iAuto:AF(W:Approx.5cm(0.16′) to Infinity, T:Approx.120cm(3.94′) to Infinity) / Program Auto:AF(W:Approx.5cm(0.16′) to Infinity, T:Approx.120cm(3.94′) to Infinity)
Filter Diameter (mm) NO
Conversion Lens compatibility NO
Carl Zeiss® lens NO
Sony G YES

Image Sensory

Sensor Type Exmor R™ CMOS Sensor
Size (Inches) 1/2.3 type(7.76mm)

Camera

Effective Pixels (Mega Pixels) Approx. 18.2
Bionz Processor YES
Face Detection YES
Smile Shutter YES
Soft Skin Mode YES
Background Defocus YES
GPS YES
Waterproof NO
Backlight correction HDR YES
Picture Effect HDR Painting, Richtone Monochrome, Miniature, Toy camera, Pop Color, Partial Color, Soft High-key, Watercolor, Illustration
Sweep Panorama NO
Intelligent Sweep Panorama YES
Underwater Sweep Panorama NO
3D Sweep Panorama YES
Clear RAW NR NO
Auto Focus Area (Multi Point) YES
Auto Focus Area (Centre weighted) YES
Auto Focus Area (Spot) YES
Auto Focus Area (Flexible Spot) NO
Manual Focus NO
Aperture Auto Mode iAuto(F3.3/F8.0(W), 2 steps with ND Filter) / Program Auto(F3.3/F8.0(W), 2 steps with ND Filter) / Manual(F3.3/F8.0(W), 2 steps with ND Filter)
Aperture Priority Mode NO
Aperture Manual Mode NO
Shutter Speed Auto Mode (sec) iAuto(4″ – 1/1600) / Program Auto(1″ – 1/1600) / Manual(30″-1/1600)
NR Slow Shutter NO
Hand Shake Alert NO
Exposure Control ± 2.0EV, 1/3EV step
White Balance Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent1, Fluorescent2, Fluorescent3, Incandescent, Flash, One Push, One Push Set
Automatic White Balance YES
Light Metering (Multi Pattern) YES
Light Metering (Centre weighted) YES
Light Metering (Spot) YES
Sharpness Setting NO
Saturation Setting NO
Contrast Setting NO
ISO Sensitivity (REI) ISO100-3200(iAuto), ISO100-12800(Superior Auto), ISO100-1600(Program Auto)
Scene Selection Soft Snap / Soft Skin / Anti Motion Blur / Backlight Correction HDR / Night Portrait / Night Scene / High Sensitivity / Handheld Twilight / Beach / Snow / Fireworks / Gourmet / Pet Mode / Landscape

SteadyShot

SteadyShot capability YES
Optical SteadyShot capability YES

Auto Focus System

AF Illuminator Auto / Off

Built-In-Flash

Flash Mode Auto / Flash On / Slow Synchro / Flash Off
Red-Eye Correction Auto / On / Off
Auto Daylight Synchronized Flash NO
Distance limitations using Flash (m) ISO Auto: Approx.0.25m to 5.3m(9 7/8 inches to 17 feet 4 3/4 inches)(W) / Approx.1.2m to 2.9 m(3 feet 11 1/4 inches to 9 feet 6 1/4 inches)(T), ISO3200: up to Approx.8.0 m(26 feet 3 inches)(W) / App

LCD/ Viewfinder

LCD Screen Size (inches) 7.5cm (3.0type)
LCD Total Dots Number 921.600
LCD Monitor Type TFT Xtra Fine
Auto Bright Monitoring NO
Optical Viewfinder NO
Electrical Viewfinder NO

Recording

Recording Media Memory Stick™ Duo / Memory Stick PRO Duo™ / Memory Stick PRO Duo™ (high speed) / Memory Stick PRO HG Duo™ / Memory Stick Micro* / Memory Stick Micro (mark 2)*
Recording Media II SD Memory Card / SDHC Memory Card / SDXC Memory Card / microSD Memory Card* / microSDHC Memory Card*
Recording Format JPEG
DCF (Design rule for Camera File System) YES
DPOF (Digital Print Order Format) YES
Burst Mode (shots) Approx.10 fps
Burst Interval (approximately sec) Approx.0.1 sec.(10 shots)
Still Image size (16M 4608 x 3456) NO
Still Image size (18 M 4896×3672) YES
Still Image size (14M 4320 x 3240) NO
Still Image size (13M 4224 x 3168) NO
Still Image size (12M 4000 x 3000) NO
Still Image size (10M 3648 x 2736) YES
Still Image size (9.0M, 3456 x 2592) NO
Still Image size (8.0M, 3264 x 2448) NO
Still Image size (7.2M 3072 x 2304) NO
Still Image size (5.0M, 2592 x 1944) NO
Still Image size (3.1M, 2048 x 1536) NO
Still Image size (VGA, 640 x 480) YES
Still Image size (16:9 mode, 1920 x 1080) YES
Still Image size (16:9 mode, 4896X2752) YES
Still Image size (16:9 mode, 4,608 x 2,592) NO
Still Image size (16:9 mode, 4,320 x 2,432) NO
Still Image size (16:9 mode, 4000 x 2248) NO
Still Image size (3:2 mode, 4000 x 2672) NO
Still Image size (3:2 mode 3648 x 2432) NO
Still Image size (3:2 mode 3456 x 2304) NO
2D Panorama HR(10,480 x 4,096) / Wide(7,152 x 1,080/4,912 x 1,920) / Standard(4,912 x 1,080/3,424 x 1,920)
3D Panorama Wide(7,152 x 1,080/4,912 x 1,920) / Standard(4,912 x 1,080/3,424 x 1,920) / 2M(1,920 x 1,080) / Sweep Multi Angle:2M(1,920 x 1,080)
Moving Image Size (1920×1080 50p Approx.28Mbps) NO
Moving Image Size (1920×1080 50i Approx.24Mbps) YES
Moving Image Size (1920×1080 50i Approx.17Mbps) NO
Moving Image Size (1440×1080 25fps Fine Approx.12Mbps) YES
Moving Image Size (1280×720 50i Fine Approx.9Mbps) YES
Moving Image Size (1280×720 30fps Standard Approx.6Mbps) NO
Moving Image Size (1280×720 25fps Fine Approx.6Mbps) YES
Moving Image Size (640×480 30fps Approx.3Mbps) NO
Moving Image Size (640×480 25fps Approx.3Mbps) YES
Moving Image Size (320×240 30fps) NO

Playback/ Edit

HD (High Definition) Playback YES (HDMI® out)
Slideshow (Playback/Music/Movie) YES
Trimming YES
Playback Zoom YES (8x)
Cue & Review (MPEG) YES
Index Playback 16 / 25 images
Image Rotation YES
Auto Image Rotation YES
Auto grouping and & Best Picture Recognition YES

General

Battery Remaining Indicator YES(NP-FG1)
Histogram Indicator YES
PTP (Picture Transfer Protocol) NO
Print Image Matching YES
PictBridge NO
Shop Front Mode YES
Start up time (approximately sec) Approx. 1.9 sec.
Menu Language English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian , Turkish, Greek, Bulgarian, Croatian, Romanian

Jacks

Multi use Terminal with HD MicroUSB, Hi-Speed USB(USB2.0), Mini HDMI
Multi use Terminal YES
AV Out NO
USB 2.0 Hi-Speed YES

Power/ Others

Battery System Lithium N
Supplied Battery NP-BG1
Stamina (battery life) with the supplied battery(s) in normal shooting condition Approx. 340 / Approx. 170min
Battery for Clock NO
Weight (g) Approx. 204g (7.2oz.)
Weight with Accessories (g) Approx. 234g (8.3oz.)
Supplied Software PlayMemories Home
Supplied Accessories Rechargeable Battery Pack NP-BG1, AC AdaptorAC-UB10/UB10B, Micro USB, Wrist Strap, Instruction Manual, AC Power Cord

Dimensions

Width (mm) 104.7
Height (mm) 59.7
Depth (mm) 33.8

Disclaimers

* Requires adaptor (not supplied)

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Conclusion

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V is a cheaper but still very capable alternative to the bells and whistles HX20V model that we liked so much. Out of the “missing” features, we regretted not having the longer 20x zoom, 1cm macro mode and the useful Custom button, but if you can live with those ommissions then the HX10V is a great camera that’s crucially cheaper than its big brother.

The move to a headline-grabbing 18 megapixel sensor may elicit groans amongst more experienced photographers, but in reality Sony have been able to maintain the excellent image quality that the previous 16 megapixel HX9V offered. The 18 megapixel backlit sensor provides excellent results from ISO 100-800, with only the faster settings of 1600 and 3200 suffering from too much noise and smearing of fine detail. You should ignore 6400 and 12800 though unless there’s really no alternative. Chromatic aberrations are well controlled and colours accurate, and the 16x 24-384mm lens commendably doesn’t suffer from too much distortion at either end of the mammoth zoom range.

The Manual shooting mode lets you set a shutter speed of up to 30 seconds for effective night-time shooting, although we missed the Aperture and Shutter Priority modes that several rivals offer, and only having two possible apertures in Manual mode does somewhat limit what you can achieve creatively. Less expereinced beginners shouldn’t be scared off the HX10V either, as Sony’s excellent hand-holding Intelligent Auto modes are as effective as the competition’s, while the Photo Creativity menu lets you experiment with the camera’s core settings without having to know all the photography jargon.

In addition to its excellent still images, the Sony HX10V also offers 1080i HD video recording, and you can even take a high-res still whilst shooting your movie masterpiece. You can use the full 16x zoom during recording, sound is stereo rather than mono, and the AVCHD format ensures that file sizes don’t get too out of control. The built-in GPS also works well, unobtrusively and reliably recording your every movement, although the camera takes a few minutes to sync with one or more satellites and the battery life is reduced by around 25% if you leave it constantly switched on.

Add in the 3D Sweep Panoramas and 3D Still Images, amazing 10fps burst shooting mode, 0.13 second auto-focusing, extensive range of in-camera Picture effects and the high-resolution 921K dot LCD screen, and it’s easy for us to highly recommend the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V as a very capable and affordable travel-zoom camera.

4.5 stars

Ratings (out of 5)
Design 4.5
Features 4.5
Ease-of-use 4.5
Image quality 4
Value for money 4

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Main Rivals

Listed below are some of the rivals of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V.

Canon Powershot SX280 HS

Canon Powershot SX280 HS Review thumbnail

The Canon PowerShot SX280 HS is a new travel-zoom camera for 2013, offering a 20x zoom lens and a 12 megapixel back-illuminated image sensor. Other key features of the Canon SX280 include built-in GPS and wi-fi connectivity, a 3 inch LCD screen, full 1080p HD movies with stereo sound, fast 14fps burst shooting, and a full range of manual and automated exposure modes. Read our in-depth Canon PowerShot SX280 HS in-depth review now…

Fujifilm Finepix F800EXR

Fujifilm Finepix F800EXR Review thumbnail

The FinePix F800EXR is the latest travel-zoom camera from Fujifilm, sporting a 20x lens with a versatile focal range of 25-500mm. The 16 megapixel F800 EXR also features wireless image transfer, GPS support, full 1080p movies, a high-contrast 3 inch LCD screen and 8fps continuous shooting. Read our in-depth Fujifilm FinePix F800 EXR review to find out if it’s the ultimate travel camera…

Nikon Coolpix S9400

Nikon Coolpix S9400 Review thumbnail

The Nikon Coolpix S9400 is a stylish and affordable travel-zoom compact camera. Featuring an 18x zoom lens with a focal range of 25-450mm, the Coolpix S9400 has a 18 megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor, high-resolution 3-inch OLED screen and can shoot 1080p Full HD movies. Read our expert Nikon Coolpix S9400 review…

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ35

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ35 Review thumbnail

The Lumix DMC-TZ35 is Panasonic’s new entry-level travel-zoom compact camera for 2013. The TZ35 (also known as the ZS25) packs a 16 megapixel MOS sensor, 20x wide-angle zoom lens, 3 inch LCD screen, 1080i HD movies, 10fps burst shooting and full manual controls into its pocketable body. Available in silver or black for £299 / $299, read our Panasonic DMC-TZ35 / ZS25 review to find out if it’s the right travel camera for you…

Pentax Optio VS20

Pentax Optio VS20 Review thumbnail

The Pentax VS20 is an innovative travel-zoom compact camera featuring a 20x image-stabilized zoom lens, 16 megapixel sensor, 3-inch LCD screen, 720p HD movies and not one but two shutter release buttons. Retailing for around £200 / $250, read our Pentax VS20 review to find out if it can take on its many travelzoom rivals…

Samsung WB850F

Samsung WB850F Review thumbnail

The Samsung WB850 is a new travel-zoom camera with a mouth-watering specification. The WB850 offers a wide-angle 21x zoom lens, 16.2 megapixels, Full 1080p video recording, 3 inch AMOLED screen, built-in wi-fi and GPS, plus full manual controls. Read our detailed Samsung WB850 review to find out if it’s a contender for the travel zoom crown.

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX20V

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX20V Review thumbnail

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX20V is a new premium travel-zoom compact camera. A 20x 25-500mm lens, built-in GPS tracking, full 1080i high-definition video with stereo sound, an 18 megapixel CMOS sensor, high-resolution 3-inch screen, manual shooting mode, 10fps continuous shooting, 3D photos, ISO range of 100-12800 and fast auto-focusing are all present and correct. Read our in-depth Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX20V review to find out if its the best travel camera that your money can buy…

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

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Review Roundup

Reviews of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V from around the web.

techradar.com »

Sony introduced the HX10V in February 2012 to sit in its latest range of superzoom travel compacts. The Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-HX10V features very similar specifications as the Sony HX20V, but comes with a shorter zoom range, at a still impressive 16x optical zoom.
Read the full review »

ephotozine.com »

The Sony Cyber-shot HX10V is one of Sony’s pocket travel zooms and features an 18.2 megapixel sensor, a 16x optical zoom lens, 3 inch screen and built in GPS. It updates the HX9v, and sits under the HX20v with its 20x optical zoom lens.
Read the full review »

reviews.cnet.com »

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V combines two of Sony’s compact megazoom cameras from 2011: the HX7V and the Editors’ Choice-winning HX9V. Basically, it has the HX9V’s body and 16x, f3.3-5.9, 24-384mm Sony G lens, but the controls and shooting options of the HX7V. Of course, if you’re not familiar with either camera, all you really need to know is that the HX10V has a nice lens, a good assortment of shooting capabilities, and turns out pleasing photos and video.
Read the full review »

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX10V Review Image

Mac users, we’re pleased to announce Macphun’s all-in-one photo editor Luminar is now available for just $69£52

with special Valentine Day bonuses (two eBooks, Vivid Wonderland preset pack, & Creative Sky Overlay pack) included for free until February 19.

Use coupon code “PHOTOBLOG” to save another $10 on Luminar.

We rated Luminar as “Highly Recommended”. Visit the Luminar web site to try it for free.

Download Luminar & Try Free »

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SOURCE:http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/sony_cybershot_dsc_hx10v_review